About E.A.S.T

East Anglian Stitch Textiles (E.A.S.T) was formed in 1995 in response to a demand for a self-supporting framework for textile artists in East Anglia, UK.


The membership of this group commenced with ten artists and now has fifteen.


Since it's inception E.A.S.T has had a close relationship with Braintree District Museum where it meets monthly and held the first E.A.S.T exhibition in 1997.The group continues to be mentored by Anthea Godfrey, Artistic Director of the Embroiderer's Guild.

Tuesday, 2 May 2017

Hurry; you have just got time to visit!


JOSEF FRANK – PATTERNS – FURNITURE – PAINTING

Room setting with at least 7 different prints


You have just got time to see this exhibition at the Fashion and Textiles Museum in London http://www.ftmlondon.org/ftm-exhibitions/josef-frank-patterns-furniture-painting/ as it ends on May 7th but I would recommend you do so.  I came out feeling refreshed and rejuvenated by the colours and designs of Josef Frank’s work.

The work of the designer and artist Josef Frank (1885-1967) is shown in the first-ever UK exhibition of his textiles. The Austrian-born architect moved to Sweden in 1933, where he developed his colourful brand of modernism, working with Estrid Ericson on furniture, glassware, lighting and interior design ideas. Together they redefined what is regarded as Swedish Modern. This exhibition in association with Millesgården, Stockholm highlights Frank’s vibrant fabric designs for Svenskt Tenn alongside a number of his previously unknown watercolours.
Huge colourful pink and orange flowers burst across the wall as you enter the show, and it’s difficult not to smile.
Following through one is encompassed by large drapes of colourful and exciting colour and pattern.
Close up all the detail can be seen.


Josef Frank was a mid century architect, furniture designer and fabric print designer. This show focuses on Joseph’s prints, along with a selection of his watercolours upstairs. When Frank retired he turned to watercolour painting instead. These were not so much to my taste; a contrast to the rich flora and fauna of his textiles, but from here a dramatic view of the prints below.
Images courtesy of The Fashion and Textiles Museum



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