About E.A.S.T

East Anglian Stitch Textiles (E.A.S.T) was formed in 1995 in response to a demand for a self-supporting framework for textile artists in East Anglia, UK.


The membership of this group commenced with ten artists and now has fifteen.


Since it's inception E.A.S.T has had a close relationship with Braintree District Museum where it meets monthly and held the first E.A.S.T exhibition in 1997.The group continues to be mentored by Anthea Godfrey, Artistic Director of the Embroiderer's Guild.

Wednesday, 19 July 2017

Cambridge Open Studios 2017


Sometime last week I picked up a Cambridge Open Studio catalogue and flicking through it  and thought I would visit a few artists the weekend just gone (15th/16th July) which actually was the third weekend out of the four that the studios were open.   On looking through the artists, to my delight, I saw that a ceramics artist, Sarah Jenkins, who I much admire was opening her studio in North Essex.  I think it was a couple of years ago I bought a piece of Sarah’s work from Bircham’s Gallery in Holt, Norfolk.  I so love her style and her work just seems to get better and better.  On reading about her it said

“Sarah's journey has been unconventional, and includes: leaving her Fine Art degree; a long period working as a plasterer in the building trade; adult education classes; clay work with people with mental health problems; a lot of experimentation, including building more than one studio and raku kilns and a sabbatical in a Cape Town ceramic studio where Sarah was able to focus on consolidating technique.

Sarah's ceramics are always hand built and fired several times. Currently, she likes to use simple slips and oxides with scant use of glaze.”

On meeting her on Saturday I found out that she had studied at Braintree College for two years and just happened to mention “Did she know Grayson Perry” as he had also studied at Braintree College.  Her reply was “Yes, I was there the same time as he was although we haven’t stayed in contact.”


Her studio is lovely, close to her home and tucked down a narrow lane that went on and on until it came to a full stop with Sarah’s thatched cottage and studio.  Her ceramics are very much a reflection of her and her experiences and I find them very inspiring - as of course they are all about landscape.  The material may be different to what I use but I just love those simple marks and shapes that capture what I see around me. 



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